How can we use an iPad reflector in a language class?

iPad reflector is a relatively new teaching tool. It allows anyone to connect the iPad screen through wireless network with a computer that can be projected on a wall screen. Multiple iPad screens can be projected simultaneously as well. This development has great potential in an ESL classroom. Through a reflector, student work can be projected instantaneously on the screen and discussed with a class.

How do I use it in my classes?

I have started looking for meaningful ways to incorporate the iPad screens in my teaching practice. In one of my co-teaching classes, grade 4 students reviewed paragraph structure in groups of five. The groups created mind maps representing the paragraph structure on paper posters. We took photos of the posters with iPads and projected the posters on the board while group representatives reported on their mind maps.

1 pic 2 pic 3 pic

            On upcoming lessons, I will ask students to create mind maps on an iPad with a mind map app. A good one to use is Simple Mind. More examples can be found on this website.

 Another advantage of the iPad reflector is that it simplifies sharing of student work and projects that are created on an iPad. Every app has different settings for exporting projects, and sometimes it can be challenging to find a quick way to export. This tool allows students to share their projects with relative simplicity.

 The iPad reflector makes it easier to deliver whole class instruction.

The reflector also makes it easier for a teacher to explain how certain iPad apps work and to communicate project/task expectations. I used the reflector for a class introduction to the SonicPic app, modeling of a SonicPic Project, and a clarification of expectations for the project. Students understood immediately what they were supposed to be doing.

As always, I am looking forward to finding more creative ways to incorporate the reflector tool in my teaching practice!

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